Tag Archives: Polish Book Institute

Found in Translation Award nomination, Deadline January 31st

If you haven’t yet made your nomination, please read further and send your email in by this Sunday!

Found in Translation Award 2010

The Book Institute reminds that 31st of January is the deadline for submitting nominations for Found in Translation Award.

The Award was announced 2 years ago by the Polish Book Institute, the Polish Cultural Institute in London, the Polish Cultural Institute in New York and W.A.B. Publishing House in Warsaw.

The Found in Translation Award is presented annually to the translator or translators of the best translation into English of a work of Polish literature published as a book in the previous calendar year.

The Award consists of a three-month placement in Krakow, with accommodation, a grant of 2,000 PLN per month, a return airline ticket to Krakow funded by the Polish Book Institute and a financial award of 10,000 PLN funded by the W.A.B. Publishing House.

The Award is presented by a Selection Committee consisting of representatives of the Polish Book Institute, the Polish Cultural Institute in London and the Polish Cultural Institute in New York. The Director of the Polish Book Institute is the President of the Selection Committee.

The name of the winner is announced during the award ceremony, which is organised each year in the winner’s country of origin, if possible during that country’s International Book Fair.

Candidates for the Award can be nominated by both private persons and institutions in Poland and abroad.

Nominations should be sent to the Polish Book Institute, 31-011 Kraków, ul. Szczepańska 1, Poland, e-mail office@bookinstitute.pl with the subject-heading FOUND IN TRANSLATION.

The nomination must include the book title, the name of the author, the name of the translator, the publisher, and the reasons for the nomination. The deadline for submitting nominations is midnight on January 31 each year.

Previous award winners: Bill Johnston (2008) for NEW POEMS by Tadeusz Różewicz (Archipelago Books, USA); Antonia Lloyd-Jones (2009) for THE LAST SUPPER by Paweł Huelle (Serpent’s Tail, UK).

After Kapuściński: Institute of Reportage (InstytutR) opens in Warsaw

The Polish Instytut Reportażu has just opened in Warsaw, established in response to a couple of problems that are hardly limited to Poland: dwindling financial resources for investigative journalism and the need to train new generations of reporters. Wojciech Tochman, author of Like Eating a Stone: Surviving the Past in Bosnia (Portobello / Atlas & Co., 2008), Mariusz Szczygieł, winner of the Prix AMPHI and the Europe Book Prize for his book Gottland, and Paweł Goźliński, Head of Gazeta Wyborcza‘s reportage section, are the founders and make up the Board. Joanna Czudec, formerly of the Book Institute in Kraków, has just moved to Warsaw to become its Director. And there is an Advisory Board that includes Wojciech Jagielski, author of Towers of Stone: The Battle of Wills in Chechnya (Seven Stories, 2009); Alicja Kapuścińska, widow of Ryszard Kapuściński; and Hanna Krall, author of The Woman From Hamburg and Other True Stories (Other Press, 2005), among other books in English. These are all absolutely fantastic people to have working together, and this is an exciting project that will no doubt go a long way to securing the future of journalism in Poland, hopefully with effects in other countries as well.

I took the liberty of translating the Institute’s mission statement:

Why an Institute of Reportage?

“We know too little about too much.”

There are various ways for people to gain more knowledge.
One way is reportage.

It was invented to provide as many people as possible with knowledge about other people.
To enable as many people as possible to understand another person.

So, since Polish reportage (and Polish literary journalism likewise) is our passion…

And since Polish reportage is rather expensive, and reporters, publishers, and editorial boards are less and less able to cover the costs of fieldwork…

Since more and more young people are interested to learn journalism, but have no one to teach them…

Since there has thus far been no central resource for information about Polish reporters and their writing…

Since more and more often we hear how it is reportage, not novels or films, that has most accurately described what has happened in Poland and the world since the fall of communism, and that a lot of journalistic writing could easily be adapted for the theater…

And since Warsaw itself seems to us to provide such excellent material for reporters…

We have established here, in Warsaw, the Institute of Reportage, which aims to do everything possible to make full sentences out of those dependent clauses above.

Sentences, and an assignment. For the coming years.

Since we know too little about too much (as Ryszard Kapuściński, the greatest representative of our vocation, writes in Travels With Herodotus), we need to support reportage. Because the more we know about the world around us, the better, safer, and more stimulating our lives will be.

Paweł Goźliński, Mariusz Szczygieł, Wojciech Tochman
Founders, InstituteR

Known in brief as InstytutR, the institute has a website up that features extensive information on recent and upcoming journalism-related events; the program for its year-long course in journalism (an impressive syllabus that involves a three-day intensive block course every month, with classes taught by Goźliński, Krall, Szczygieł, and Tochman, along with other well-known Polish reportage authors like Agata Tuszyńska, Jacek Hugo-Bader (whose reportage on Russia, White Fever, has just been bought by Portobello in the UK), and Lidia Ostalowska; as well as information on books, radio and theater tie-ins, and photoreportage. So far the website is only available in Polish. But an English-language version is in the works, so make sure to check back for it.

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Why an Institute of Reportage? —

“We know too little about too much.”

There are various ways for people to gain more knowledge.

One way is reporting.

It was invented to provide as many people as possible with knowledge about other people.

To enable as many people as possible to understand another person.

So, since Polish reportage (and Polish literary journalism likewise) is our passion…

And since Polish reportage is rather expensive, and reporters, publishers, and editorial boards are less and less able to cover the costs of fieldwork…

Since more and more young people are interested to learn journalism, but have no one to teach them…

Since there has thus far been no central resource for information about Polish reporters and their writing…

Since more and more often we hear how it is reportage, not novels or films, that has most accurately described what has happened in Poland and the world since the fall of communism, and that a lot of journalistic writing could easily be adapted for the theater…

And since Warsaw itself seems to us to provide such excellent material for reporters…

We have established here, in Warsaw, the Institute of Reportage, which aims to do everything possible to make full sentences out of those dependent clauses above.

Sentences, and an assignment. For the coming years.

Since we know too little about too much (as Ryszard Kapuściński, the greatest representative of our vocation, writes in Travels With Herodotus), we need to support reportage. Because the more we know about the world around us, the better, safer, and more stimulating our lives will be.

Paweł Goźliński, Mariusz Szczygieł, Wojciech Tochman
Founders, InstituteR

Biserka Rajčić awarded 2009 Trans-Atlantyk Prize

The highlight of the 2nd International Congress of Translators of Polish Literature, of course, was the award ceremony for this year’s Trans-Atlantyk Prize, which went to the Serbian translator Biserka Rajčić. It was a lovely event, which was introduced by the Book Institute Director Grzegorz Gauden and featured a string quartet that played a stunning piece of music, the name of which I forgot to learn… Last year’s winner, Xenia Staroshyelska, did the honors. Here’s an excerpt of the description on the Book Institute website:

Over her forty-five years of translation work, Biserka Rajčić has translated and published 77 books in all spheres of the humanities (poetry, prose, essays, philosophy, theatre studies, political sciences, historiography etc.). She has translated around 330 of the most outstanding Polish artists, philosophers, and historians of all generations, including: Witkiewicz, Gombrowicz, Miłosz, Schulz, Szymborska, Herbert, Różewicz, Hartwig, Międzyrzecki, Białoszewski, Lem, Filipowicz, Herling-Grudziński, Konwicki, Mrożek, Kapuściński, Brandys, Nowakowski, Stachura, Fink, Zagajewski, Lipska, Kornhauser, Barańczak, Tokarczuk, Gretkowska, Goerke, Świetlicki, Kielar, Podsiadło, Sonnenberg, Różycki, Kołakowski, Kott, Kantor, Grotowski, Zanussi, Topolski, Łowmiański, and Michnik. Since 1962 she has published over 470 texts in magazines of every sort, devoted to authors she has translated and Polish literary-cultural life. Her bibliography includes over 1584 items. She has also published 2 books about Poland: ‘Poljska civilizacija’ and ‘Moj Krakov.’

She has received the highest Polish and Serb distinctions for her translation and promotion work, including the Serb Translators’ Union Award for lifetime achievement, the Jovan Maksimović Award for translation from the Russian, the Belgrade Radio 2 Award for her many-year (1958-2008) co-operation in the field of literature and art, the ZAIKS Award, the Polish Republic Order of Service, delivered by the President of the Polish Republic, the Polish Ministry of Foreign Affairs’ Diploma for outstanding service to the promotion of Poland in the world, the Zbigniew Dominiak Award for the translation of poetry, and the Stanisław Ignacy Witkiewicz Award for achievement in promoting Polish theatre culture in the world.

The Trans-Atlantyk Prize is the Book Institute’s annual award for the most outstanding promoter of Polish literature abroad. Its previous winners are:  Henryk Bereska (2005), Anders Bodegard (2006), Albrecht Lempp (2007) and Xenia Staroshyelska (2008).

Stanisław Barańczak wins Silesius Poetry Award

This just in from the Book Institute:

Stanisław Barańczak will receive the Lifetime Achievement Award in the second annual Wrocław Silesius Poetry Award.

“We mainly have Barańczak to thank for the whole great ferment in Polish poetry at the turn of the 1960s/70s. He was the main representative of the new mystical poetry of the late 60s. And it was he, finally, who brought Polish readers a wide range of artists from England, America and Russia through his translations,” stated Prof. Jacek Łukaszewicz, the head of the jury.

The competition jury also announced seven nominees for the book of the year award, and three for the debut of the year award.

The following works have been nominated for the book of the year: Enjoy by Roman Honet, Lost by Krystyna Miłobędzka, Tiny! Tiny! by Edward Pasewicz, Trap by Marcin Sendecki, Filters by Adam Wiedemann, Everything by Bohdan Zadura, and A Song of Relationships and Dependencies by Eugeniusz Tkaczyszyn-Dycki.

For debut of the year, the nominees are: Dariusz Basiński for Duszan Bought a Motorbike, Sławomir Elsner for Antipodes, and Monika Mosiewicz for Cosinus salsa.

The winners in the various categories will be announced on 17 April at a gala ceremony at Wrocław’s Polish Theater. Apart from the Silesius statuettes, the winners will receive cash awards: 100,000 zloties for Lifetime Achievement, 50,000 zloties for Book of the Year, and 20,000 zloties for Debut.

The Wrocław Silesius Poetry Awards are organized by the City of Wrocław. The awards are intended to promote the most important works and artists in Polish poetry. Last year’s award for lifetime achievement went to Tadeusz Różewicz.

2nd World Congress of Translators of Polish Literature to take place in June

Here’s some great news from the Book Institute (from their website):

Four years have passed since the First World Congress of Translators of Polish Literature. With that extraordinarily successful gathering in mind, the Book Institute has decided to organize a Second Congress this year, which will take place June 4-6 in Krakow. The event is sponsored by Bogdan Zdrojewski, the Minister of Culture and National Heritage.

One hundred seventy four individuals from fifty countries took part in the First World Congress of Translators of Polish Literature, which happened in Krakow in May 2005. Participants ranged from translators with decades of experience in the field and considerable accomplishments—Henryk Bereska, Anders Bodegård, Bill Johnston, Zofia Bobowicz, Esther Kinsky, and Karol Lesman—to others who are just getting their feet wet.

This year’s Congress will provide its participants with opportunities to get to know the most recent Polish literature, to meet with authors, literary critics, and publishers, and to talk with translators from other countries. As with the previous Congress, a program of panel discussions and workshops devoted to the work of Polish authors and newly published books is expected.

The Congress will also feature the award ceremony for the fifth Transatlantyk Prize, which is awarded annually to an outstanding promoter of Polish literature abroad. Previous recipients of the Transatlantyk Prize are: Henryk Bereska (2005), Anders Bodegård (2006), Albrecht Lempp (2007), and Ksenia Starosielska (2008).

[Update] By the way, nominations for the Transatlantyk Prize are still being taken until March 31. More information here.

Huelle’s COLD SEA TALES

The Book Institute also has a nice write-up on their website by Jagiellonian University professor Jerzy Jarzębski about Paweł Huelle’s newest book, a collection of short stories titled COLD SEA TALES (Opowieści chłodnego morza). I think Antonia Lloyd-Jones, who recently translated Huelle’s THE LAST SUPPER for Serpent’s Tail, has translated some of these already. I like Huelle the short story writer (of MOVING HOUSE AND OTHER STORIES) almost better than Huelle the novelist (with the exception of MERCEDES BENZ, CASTORP, and DAVID WEISER, of course), so this new collection, just published by Znak, promises to be a real delight. Hopefully we’ll see it in English soon.

huelle

Transatlantic Prize 2009

The Polish Book Institute has announced its fifth annual Transatlantic Prize, which is awarded to “an outstanding ambassador of Polish literature abroad.”

[The Transatlantic Prize’s] aim is to promote Polish literature on the world market and to provide a focal point for translators of Polish literature and its promoters (literary critics, scholars and organizers of cultural events).

The prize is awarded annually and is worth €10,000.

The winner is chosen by a Transatlantic Prize Committee including: Anders Bodegård, Jerzy Jarniewicz, Albrecht Lempp, Jarosław Mikołajewski, Ksenia Starosielska and the Director of the Book Institute [Grzegorz Gauden].

Up to this date the prize has been awarded to: Henryk Bereska (2005), Anders Bodegård (2006), Albrecht Lempp (2007) and Ksenia Starosielska (2008).

Candidates may be nominated by Polish and foreign cultural organizations, academic institutions, publishers, associations and private persons. Nominees may be of any citizenship other then Polish (including Poles with a foreign passport).

The deadline for nomination is March 31. See the Book Institute website for more details.